UKARIA honours our First Nations by fostering a shared sense of respect for this land, and we acknowledge and pay our respects to the Peramangk, traditional custodians of the land on which the Cultural Centre stands.

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MARK ATKINS, ERKKI VELTHEIM AND TOS MAHONEY

MONDAY 25–SUNDAY 31 JULY 2022

Pictured L-R: Mark Atkins, Erkki Veltheim and Tos Mahoney (Photo Credit: Matt Byrne)

MUNGANGGA GARLAGULA

(Wajarri: Sitting by the fire at night)

Mark Atkins is a legendary didgeridoo virtuoso and innovator, whose music and words consistently jump borders and upset ready definitions. Erkki Veltheim is a groundbreaking composer and performer, whose work spans noise, audiovisual installation, improvisation, notated music, electroacoustic composition, pop arrangements and cross-disciplinary performance. Together with Tos Mahoney, Artistic Director of Tura, they have been creating a new stage show – this UKARIA residency marked the second creative development of Mungangga Garlagula. The guiding principle for the work remains the same, but its final form has been augmented with the use of electronics and recordings to summon disparate musicians from across Australia.

Mungangga Garlagula is commissioned and produced by Tura, supported by Ulrike Klein AO and the Australia Council for the Arts. There will be a showing entitled Nightfalls at UKARIA Cultural Centre in October 2022 as part of Finding Our Voice, so keep an eye out for that announcement in the UKARIA newsletter and on social media.

On Thursday 28 July 2022, UKARIA’s Acting Communications Manager Ben Nicholls chatted with the creative team about the project. In conversation, Mark is easy going and understated, insisting that this project is just ‘something a little different’, built on ‘the little things.’ But all of those little things – forming an invitation to sit with him by firelight and hear his haunting stories – promise something new in Australian art and storytelling.

Mark: Any story, every story you can think about, it's been built off, or it’s coming off the back of telling by fire. And all the stories that I’ve grown up with as a kid, with Uncles and Aunties just telling stories around the fire, you know, tall ones too, sure… but you always had that warmth of that fire, you know, and you could be leaning in, listening, and watching, through the smoke and the sparks, then the flickering flames, the face. And they're always there in your mind, and then you sort of lean back a bit and you look back into the shadows. It was just that place, you know, and that's what I'm looking at trying to create… people come into a cold place and then the stories start and the fire flickers.

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE

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FIONA HILL

WEDNESDAY 8–FRIDAY 17 JUNE 2022

Sydney-based composer Fiona Hill's UKARIA residency involved a team of collaborators working on a site-specific project entitled Be Here Now. 

Later this year Fiona will work with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra Fellows to complete the work, which involves both a live performance outcome as well as a short film.

'The film will draw on our response to being in and resonating with a specific place, in this instance the grounds and buildings of UKARIA. The music will include gestural control elements based on connection to place and interaction with the surroundings, in particular the physical aspects of the environment,' Fiona said.

Composer, Producer | Fiona Hill

Director, Choreographer | Sue Healey

Dancer, Choreographer | Lisa Synnott

Cinematographer | Sam Oster

Cellist | Hilary Kleinig

Camera Assistant | Mike Lim


(Pictured below L-R: Sam, Sue, Fiona and Lisa)

Rachel Bruerville, our Communications Coordinator, interviewed Fiona Hill at UKARIA about her project:

How has site-specific work become your focus?

I’ve always been interested in connection to place, and I’m always striving to incorporate this into my creative practice. For instance, I live in the Blue Mountains, so I spend a lot of time going out into nature and connecting with that physical environment. In exploring the landscape here at UKARIA and Twin Peaks, I’ve found beautiful textures, beautiful trees… there have been lots of walks around the summit and I’ve spent time in the UKARIA gardens both during the day and at night, being in the landscape and finding resonance with it. The title of the project, Be Here Now, illustrates that resonance – being in the moment, in the space.

How might this translate to the new music you are creating here?

A lot of the music when it’s composed will be gestural. I’ve been playing with wearable ‘ring controllers’ – there are six different movements which are mapped to MIDI channels – you connect the controllers via Bluetooth to your computer and then map the gestures to different parameters – for example, one particular movement could be mapped to a filter, another to a resonance control, triggering different samples etc.… so when we’ve been exploring the environment, and the gestures we use (like when we might touch the bark of a tree and map its texture), this will form part of the score. I love texture in my music – shifting textural ideas – and this is always reflected in nature too.

Our process has been really playful – I might see something, or pick up on something, and I won’t have said anything, and then my collaborators will discover it in a different way… making those connections with each other and with the place as well has been a really interesting process… playing within the environment and seeing what reveals itself.

I’m really inspired by the way First Nations understand Country… there’s a book called Song Spirals: Sharing Women’s Wisdom of Country Through Songlines that was written by the Gay'wu Group of Women. I’ve loved reading this book and learning more about the concept of Country – that it’s everything – it’s not just what we want it to be, it’s everything that is here. Everything is connected. Learning from the stories and culture of First Nations people is integral to understanding ourselves as a nation, trying to come to a truer understanding of who we are.

I see my compositional practice as quite a spiritual quest, so absorbing a sense of this place and then having that come out in the music, and being quiet enough within myself to then be able to hear what is around me.

What might your ‘finished product’ look like in the end?

In terms of my scores, I often tend to go back to traditional notation, because I find that’s what the players are used to and it’s just easier – they’ll get what I want quicker! Sometimes there might be more gestural or graphic things within that notation, or the score might be more about how you move on the instrument, rather than legislating specific notes. I'm also currently experimenting with how I can streamline this process for myself as a composer, from idea to score more quickly.

There will be a live performance with the SSO Fellows later this year [2022], but I will also have a fixed film that exists on its own. There will definitely be footage from UKARIA projected in live performance, perhaps projecting onto the players as well as the areas surrounding them… more like an installation rather than simply a film being shown on a screen.

What do you feel is special about this place?

The shifting landscape here is incredible – you can see it in the way the clouds and the rain blow in and out, in watching the eagles soaring around the summit, in the different rocks you can see up on the summit… just everything. It’s just special, it’s just beautiful. I’ve done a lot of exploring on foot – a few trail runs, a big loop coming down to the freeway then back to the summit – the connection between Twin Peaks and UKARIA, and being able to see UKARIA from up on top of the hill and then vice versa, I love that… the perspectives are completely different and it’s been amazing being able to explore both places.

This place has just felt incredibly welcoming, and I feel very fortunate to have time here in this space just to be creative and to focus. I’ve got a young family as well (including two young children and energetic dogs!), so having time where I’m not having to look after other people’s needs and balance that with my own projects, and teaching, and all of the things that we bring together to make our freelance careers work – it’s just so brilliant to have time where you’re supported to create. Just to have quiet time here – you can just focus on the creative work and not have to worry about anything else. I also keep coming back to this idea of the journey of an artist being a process of self-discovery, and I think that the more I create, the more I find that’s absolutely true, especially when I can get out of the way enough for that process to be organic.

This residency was made possible by a partnership between UKARIA and the Australia Council for the Arts, and proudly supported by Ulrike Klein AO.

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VINCE JONES AND PAUL GRABOWSKY

MONDAY 2–THURSDAY 5 MAY 2022

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PAUL CASTLES
MONDAY 4–TUESDAY 13 APRIL 2022

Paul Castles is a composer whose music re-conjures how stories are told through live, experiential, and digital performance.

He has been composer-in-residence with Georipae ("The Fountain", winner of Best New Creative Work at the 6th Daegu International Music Theatre Festival), Clare Cook Dance Theatre, and Basin Arts. His score for Wild Goose Dreams was nominated for a Drama Desk for Outstanding Music and produced by the Public Theatre in New York, La Jolla Playhouse, and Theatre Royal Bath. His music has also been performed by the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Victorian Opera, Art Eloquentiae, Broken Box Mime Theatre, Alicia Crossley, Nexas Quartet, Sydney Symphony Orchestra Fellows, Clock Ensemble, and others.

Paul's current projects include "The Percipients" with Sibyl Kempson & 7 Daughts of Eve, an artist-in-residence at UKARIA Cultural Centre where he is creating a new project for Light Adelaide, and a collaboration with poet Nicole Lee.

Fellowships include the Sundance Institute, Centre for Ballet and the Arts, Public Studio of the Public Theatre, Yaddo, Composer/Librettist Studio at new Dramatists, Old Vic Lab, New Opera Ventures, New York Theatre Workshop, and Yaddo. Paul is a graduate of the Tisch School of the Arts of New York University and the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

Paul used residency at UKARIA to develop a new work of immersive music-driven multi-sensory theatre being created for Light Adelaide with production by Wldr. He will be joined by an interdisciplinary team of collaborators including pianist and creative director Nicole Brady, sound designer and engineer Bob Scott, violinist Alexandra Osborne, cellist Rachael Tobin, cinematographer Alexander Smith, and chef Brendan Wessels.


‘Essentially what we’re working towards is filming and recording most of the music in the hall here,’ Paul says. ‘We have a cinematographer who’ll be working with Nicole on capturing a lot of local scenery and light.’

‘UKARIA is obviously a really beautiful place – how the sun comes up and the light hits the trees ties into the whole ritualistic aspect of music and eating,’ Nicole says. ‘Our project starts in the early morning and then travels through the day. We’ll start tomorrow [Saturday 9 April] at Ngeringa winery – we’re going to film the harvesting of the grapes. There’s a lot of different colours and textures we want to capture.’

‘It’s also a collaboration with the chef at Aurora,’ Paul explains. ‘The idea is to treat taste in the same way we treat design principles like visuals or physical design or music and sound. There are four movements that are being matched with four taste experiences that the chef is devising. There’s no strict narrative but there is an underlying story to it about the experience of memory.’

‘Unlike visuals or written text (which our brains interpret very literally), I think our brains have a harder time interpreting sound and music – and also taste – because they’re more abstract. So they often become very evocative when it comes to memory. I think most people have certain pieces of music or experiences of taste that are really nostalgic or hearken back to really specific memories.’

‘So that’s the idea behind it – we’re creating a synesthetic, multi-sensory work in a context that ties into the ways our brains are changing in terms of how we experience things. Technology is unlocking a lot of potential, and The Lab has these amazing screens that can trick the brain into thinking you’re somewhere else.’

‘There’ll be an actor guiding the whole thing,’ Nicole explains. ‘People will be standing in a space together, enjoying evocative bites of food. There’ll be text that will shape things as well – pre-recorded as part of the sound design.’ After the residency, the long process of postproduction will begin. ‘We’re essentially making a film and a 360-degree soundtrack, mixed in Dolby Atmos.’

‘That’s the really nice thing about being here, recording the music and visuals, and getting to create it,’ Paul says. ‘After this week, all those things will exist and we’ll be able to work with them. Then we go through a whole iterative physical design process, probably in the space in Adelaide. We’re hoping to present it sometime towards the end of the year, in spring, but we’ll see!’

This residency was made possible by a partnership between UKARIA and the Australia Council for the Arts.

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MONDAY 21–FRIDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2022

AUSTRALIAN DANCE THEATRE

'This week we have been lucky enough to be in the incredible surrounds of the UKARIA Cultural Centre in the Adelaide Hills, working on Daniel's first work, which you will see in a few months.

After exploring the spaces and landscape in Mount Barker with definitely agree with Founder Ulrike Klein AO that UKARIA is 'a place of beauty, of music, of healing, of community, of spirit.'

We would like to thank everyone at UKARIA for their very generous support of the company in these important first few weeks of the year, as we come together as a new ensemble and create dance in this spectacular space.'

– Australian Dance Theatre


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MARK ATKINS, ERKKI VELTHEIM AND TOS MAHONEY

MONDAY 15–SUNDAY 21 MARCH 2021

Poet/musician Mark Atkins, composer/performer Erkki Veltheim and Tura New Music's Artistic Director Tos Mahoney have gathered from Tamworth, Melbourne and Perth to devise a new stage show.

MUNGANGGA GARLAGULA
(Wajarri: Sitting by the fire at night)

The project celebrates Mark Atkins' unique gifts as a poet, storyteller, singer-songwriter and didgeridoo virtuoso, collaborating with some of Australia's leading musicians to create a full-length program imagined as a gathering around a campfire. It will feature poems drawn from Mark's life, stories inspired by the Australian natural and cultural landscape, and tall tales of bushmen, travellers and other colourful characters.

'This is a wonderful opportunity for me to celebrate and honour my Yamatji heritage through my contemporary existence,' Atkins says. 'The best moments happen around the fire late at night under the stars... I'm inspired to tell stories real and imagined.'

The project is produced by Tura in partnership with UKARIA and supported by Ulrike Klein AO and the Australia Council for the Arts. Remote work started last year with commissions from the key creatives. This week is the next stage of the development, with stage three to happen in November at UKARIA with the full ensemble, which includes Genevieve Lacey, Stephen Magnusson, Anthony Pateras, Scott Tinkler and Vanessa Tomlinson.

Veltheim comments: 'Having worked with Mark for a number of years on the incredible Tura remote touring programs, I became increasingly aware of the depth of Mark's poetry and insights into the enigma that is Australia. To have the resources and personnel we have will no doubt produce powerful and profound new work.'

Mahoney adds: 'This is a truly national project exploring the mostly unacknowledged writing prowess of one of our best known First Nations musicians. Not only do we wait in excited anticipation for the outcome of this development period, but to take these outcomes to festivals around Australia and eventually the world.'

Tura New Music is a national organisation based in Perth advocating and producing new music-based programs with a focus on cross-cultural collaboration.


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14–24 OCTOBER 2019

Thomas Meadowcroft – So Long Country

From the 14–24 October, composer Thomas Meadowcroft developed a new work entitled So Long Country, featuring Speak Percussion and the Malaysian master of traditional Kelantan instruments, Kamrul Hussin.

With contrasting playing traditions and an eclectic collection of instruments, the musicians assembled their collective memory to make songs from an imaginary place in the future, formed by rising sea levels. Part satire, part fantasy, part farewell, So Long Country brings forth an imagined future and makes valuable comment on current globalised music-making practices.

This residency was made possible by a partnership between UKARIA and the Australia Council for the Arts.



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Andrew Schulz – Dark Well

Composer Andrew Schulz developed Dark Well, an immersive site-specific composition of about 90 minutes for two pianos, visual and audio projections and lighting design. The work consists of a music score which will be performed live with some pre-recorded sounds, amplification and various extensions to normal performance technique. The work is intended for staging in a dark space such as a quarry, silo, water tank, mine shaft, or a cave.

This residency was made possible by a partnership between UKARIA and the Australia Council for the Arts.



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18–25 FEBRUARY 2019

Archie Roach and Paul Grabowsky – Tell Me Why



Indigenous singer/songwriter Archie Roach and jazz pianist Paul Grabowsky were in residence at UKARIA in February 2019, developing a new album to coincide with the release of Archie's memoir Tell Me Why – an idea that resulted from a conversation after their sold out concert at UKARIA in November 2018.


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14–22 DECEMBER 2018

ANNA GOLDSWORTHY

Pianist and writer Anna Goldsworthy develops her first novel in the artist's studio at UKARIA Cultural Centre.

"A series of stories, constructed loosely on the form of variations. The theme of this book is the rites of passage of a woman's life; the variants take the form of time and circumstance. These interconnected stories chart the seven ages of Ruby, an Australian woman, based on stories my grandmother told me. The final work is at once epic in scale – spanning nearly nine decades of a woman's life – but constructed as a mosaic. Central to it is a portrait of a marriage, and through this the stories examine the trauma of war."

– Anna Goldsworthy

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5–9 NOVEMBER 2018

NICK WALES – KINETIC WONDERLAND

From 5–9 November, award winning Australian musician and composer Nick Wales was in residence at UKARIA. The residency marked the first stage in the creative development of a new work entitled Kinetic Wonderland – a collaboration with Japanese kinetic sculptor artist Shun Ito. Their shared vision is to create a space of beauty, peace and wonder through music and visual art with immersion into the vibrations of the natural world.

Both artists use technology in organic ways. The music of Nick Wales incorporates the organics of acoustic instruments interwoven with digital manipulation and electronics. Shun Ito's metallic sculptural work is similarly based in technical precision, creating organic forms that move in space to reflect the complexity and beauty of nature.

Shun Ito travelled from Japan to join Nick Wales for the residency, which also included musicians Bree van Reyk (percussion), Veronique Serret (violin), Jess Green (voice and electric guitar), Alyx Dennison (voice and keys), and designers Bob Scott (sound design), Tony Assness (theatre design) and Damien Cooper (lighting design). Kinetic Wonderland is produced by Virginia Hyam and Julianne Pierce from creative producing company Art Engineers.

Key creative personnel in residence at UKARIA:

Nick Wales | composer

Shun Ito | kinetic sculptor

Bree van Reyk | percussion

Veronique Serret | violin

Jess Green | voice / electric guitar

Alyx Dennison | voice / keys

Bob Scott | sound design

Tony Assness | theatre design

Damien Cooper | lighting design

Virginia Hyam | producer

Julianne Pierce | producer

This was the final residency for 2018 as part of a partnership between UKARIA and the Australia Council for the Arts.


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OCTOBER 2018

PAUL KELLY, JAMES LEDGER, ALICE KEATH AND THE SERAPHIM TRIO

THIRTEEN WAYS TO LOOK AT BIRDS

Birds have fascinated poets for centuries, not just for their song and flight but as symbols: of hope, freedom, love, communication, peace, luck good and bad, and migration. And what better way to honour them than by sending songs out into the air?

In a new song cycle commissioned by the 2019 Adelaide Festival from an idea by Anna Goldsworthy, Australian music legend Paul Kelly and leading Australian composer James Ledger have written thirteen new songs and soundscapes inspired by birds. Using the words of John Keats, Thomas Hardy, Emily Dickinson, Judith Wright, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Gwen Harwood, A.D. Hope and others, each poem is its own world – delicate and intimate at times, colossal and soaring at others, with all states in between.

Paul Kelly and James Ledger will be joined by celebrated piano trio Seraphim (Anna Goldsworthy – piano, Helen Ayres – violin and Tim Nankervis – cello) and singer-songwriter Alice Keath to create a unique marriage of electronics, acoustic instruments and the human voice, celebrating winged creatures from the barn owl to the nightingale, from the thornbill to the falcon, from the magpie to the swan.

The final creative development of this project was held at UKARIA in October 2018.

Thirteen Ways to Look at Birds will premiere at the Adelaide Town Hall on Friday 1 and Saturday 2nd March 2019.


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SEPTEMBER 2018

GORDON HAMILTON AND TOM THUM

Queensland-based composer and conductor Gordon Hamilton and international beatboxing sensation Tom Thum developed new works that will be premiered in upcoming performances in Cologne, Germany.

You can see a little bit of what they produced in this video of their new work Rosella Resurrection – aptly named after a parrot flew into the glass window while they were thinking of a name.

This was the first residency as part of a partnership between UKARIA and the Australia Council for the Arts.



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11–13 JULY 2018

QUARTET AND COUNTRY

A commissioning initiative between UKARIA, the Port Fairy Spring Music Festival and the Australian String Quartet.

Key creative personnel in residence at the UKARIA Cultural Centre:

Ursula Yovich Indigenous Composer / Performer
Djakapurra Munyarryun Indigenous Composer / Performer
Iain Grandage
Collaborator on compositional elements
Australian String Quartet Performers



Supported by UKARIA, Ulrike Klein AO, and the Klein Family Foundation.

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5–9 FEBRUARY 2018

SYZYGY ENSEMBLE, THE SONG COMPANY AND DR KATY ABBOTT

HIDDEN THOUGHTS

Hidden Thoughts is a daring new work by Dr Katy Abbott. Based on the anonymous confessions of 200 women and featuring live audience participation, the work is in its final stage of collaborative development.

Composed for The Song Company and Syzygy Ensemble, two of Australia's leading ensembles, Hidden Thoughts is a 60-minute work based upon responses to an online survey devised by Dr Abbott and author Kaz Cooke, consisting of a series of questions intended to uncover the most intimately held thoughts of the women that took part.

Concert audiences will be surveyed in the same manner and their responses integrated into each performance, and it is for the purpose of this integration that Dr Abbott, director Thomas de Mallet Burgess and the musicians of Syzygy Ensemble and The Song Company will travel to UKARIA Cultural Centre for a creative development residency, from 5–9 February 2018.

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SATURDAY 27 JANUARY – SUNDAY 4 FEBRUARY 2018

MUSICA VIVA AUSTRALIA

FUTUREMAKERS 2018–2019

Pianist Aura Go and percussive artist Matthias Schack-Arnott, Musica Viva's FutureMakers 2018-19 artists, were joined by the initiative's leadership team and mentors for a nine-day residency at UKARIA.

This residency began the fellows’ time in FutureMakers and was focused on capacity building and artistic leadership mentorship for them. Under the direction of Genevieve Lacey, theatre director Naomi Edwards, innovation and strategy director Lynette Nixon, independent producer Michaela Coventry and leadership expert Chris Kotur worked closely with the participants to guide their creative business skills and artistic development as they commenced their time in the initiative. The residency allowed the FutureMakers artists to work intensively on future musical and business plans, including time to begin shaping the music-centred performances projects they will develop over the two years of their involvement. Professor Margaret Barrett and Karlin Love from The University of Queensland was also at the residency continuing their interviews and research on FutureMakers, the outcomes of which will be featured in forthcoming publications on radical education programs.

Following the UKARIA residency, the full details of the FutureMakers 2018–19 activity and the two inspiring emerging leaders involved over these two years was announced.


2017

20 NOVEMBER – 1 DECEMBER 2017

ANNA GOLDSWORTHY

Pianist and writer Anna Goldsworthy develops her first novel in the artist's studio at UKARIA Cultural Centre.

"A series of stories, constructed loosely on the form of variations. The theme of this book is the rites of passage of a woman's life; the variants take the form of time and circumstance. These interconnected stories chart the seven ages of Ruby, an Australian woman, based on stories my grandmother told me. The final work is at once epic in scale – spanning nearly nine decades of a woman's life – but constructed as a mosaic. Central to it is a portrait of a marriage, and through this the stories examine the trauma of war."

– Anna Goldsworthy

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7–11 AUGUST 2017

QUARTET AND COUNTRY

A commissioning initiative between UKARIA, the Port Fairy Spring Music Festival and the Australian String Quartet.

Key creative personnel in residence at the UKARIA Cultural Centre:

Stephen Pigram Indigenous Composer / Performer

Lou Bennett Indigenous Composer / Performer

Iain Grandage Collaborator on compositional elements

Australian String Quartet Performers

This project was generously supported by the UKARIA Foundation.

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20–23 FEBRUARY 2017

heard this and thought of you

Creative Development Workshop

The artists in residence intend to turn an internationally acclaimed recording project into a full-length piece of live, music-centred theatre. Taking existing music (contemporary Australian works written for them, as well as old music that they've reimagined), and texts written in response to their performances, from writers such as Helen Garner, Michael Leunig, Chloe Hooper, Luke Davies, Jana Wendt, John Clarke, Robert Dessaix and Scott Rankin, they will create a theatrical performance with music at its heart.

Key creative personnel in residence at the UKARIA Cultural Centre:

Genevieve Lacey recorder
James Crabb
classical accordion
Andy Packer
director
Michaela Coventry
producer
Katherine Tonkin
actor
Geoff Cobham
designer

Andy Ellis videographer

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25 JANUARY – 3 FEBRUARY 2017

Arcadia Winds with the Australian String Quartet

The inaugural Musica Viva FutureMakers ensemble Arcadia Winds spent a week at UKARIA rehearsing with the Australian String Quartet for upcoming performances in the 2017 Perth International Arts Festival.

Key creative personnel in residence at the UKARIA Cultural Centre:

Genevieve Lacey Artistic Director

Kiran Phatak flute
David Reichelt oboe
Lloyd Van’t Hoff clarinet
Rachel Shaw horn
Matthew Kneale bassoon

Dale Barltrop violin
Francesca Hiew violin
Stephen King viola
Sharon Draper cello

Stephen Newton double bass
Lachlan Skipworth composer

To watch a video of Arcadia Winds reflecting on their experiences as the first FutureMakers upon competing the two-year fellowship, click here.

2016

6 – 11 JULY 2016

Quartet and Country – a commissioning initiative between UKARIA, the Port Fairy Spring Music Festival and the Australian String Quartet.

Key creative personnel in residence at the UKARIA Cultural Centre:

Deborah Cheetham AO Indigenous Composer / Performer
William Barton
Indigenous Composer / Performer
Iain Grandage
Collaborator on compositional elements
Jessie Lloyd
Mentored composer
Eric Murrawuy Mentored composer
Australian String Quartet Performers

This project is generously supported by the Klein Family Foundation.


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